Category Archives: diy

Deploy Large Stacks Easily in ANY Cloud with Juju

First, a lot of people will ask, “What is Juju?”.  I had also not heard of it; however after using it, I can say it is an amazing piece of software.  It is made by Canonical, and this is their description of it:

“Juju is a state-of-the-art, open source modelling tool for operating software in the cloud. Juju allows you to deploy, configure, manage, maintain, and scale cloud applications quickly and efficiently on public clouds, as well as on physical servers, OpenStack, and containers. You can use Juju from the command line or through its beautiful GUI.”  

Essentially, JuJu makes deploying large, complicated, and difficult piece of software a breeze.  It also has a great GUI, and CLI tools.  It also supports many clouds as you can see below. 

I am currently testing this for my use case.  However, if you have to manage several clouds/customers/etc, it has the potential to save tons of time from an operational perspective.

 

Want to install it? Super easy on Ubuntu via a SNAP:

sudo snap install juju --classic

This will setup a new controller on your system behind a NAT’d interface.  It will then walk you through the setup.  Also, I highly recommend a run through of the install documentation; especially if you are going to run it on your own hardware; or localhost (LXD).  Recommended for ‘easy’ setup are the following: Ubuntu 18.04+, LXD, and ZFS (if on your own servers). ZFS is highly  recommended by myself for many other reasons we can get into later, see ZFSonLinux.org.

How to use a PS1 in Linux/MAC

Here are the PS1‘s I use for my daily driver.  Feel free to take them and change them up.

I use different colors, so one doesn’t accidentally login or run something as root (which is in red, users are yellow).

To use these, simply copy and paste them into either the root user; or regular user’s .bashrc.

Alternatively you can add them to /etc/profile to make them enforced system wide. 

For MAC, it is the same; however the PS1 is a little different. See below.

 

Root

 

User

Handy One-Liners – Full Debian Update

This one is great for a “Full Update” on debian / ubuntu machines.

It calls the script without ever installing anything (assuming curl is installed).  Be sure to run as root, either with sudo or as root directly.

As you can see in the snippet; it uses a script that is remotely hosted (in a github gist).  This is great because you  can see exactly what it does by looking at the script.  It just calls system commands, so it can’t do anything malicious.  Just run sudo, then the above command and it will run the below script:

Another trick you can do with something like this, is copy it to  /usr/bin/fullupdate (as root of course), and ensure its executable “sudo chmod +x /usr/bin/fullupdate”.  Then you can call “sudo fullupdate”, from anywhere and use it when needed. Alternatively, you can use it on a cron to run on a schedule!  If you don’t want all the options, just download the script and change it for your liking.

 

Welcome to open source.

DIY Eclipse Glasses

Nothing Fancy here, but they work. (Use are your own risk)

First off, never look directly into the sun!  Always have the PROPER eye protection!

Supplies
1. Pen
2. Paper
3. Cereal box
4. Aluminum foil
5. Scissors

Yes, that’s it!

How to make an eclipse viewer yourself:
1. Put the cereal box on the piece of paper and trace the outline of the bottom of the box, creating a rectangle.
2. Cut out the rectangle.
3. Take two pieces of tape and make loops, then place them on both ends of the rectangle.
4. Take the piece of paper and place it inside the bottom of the cereal box tape-side down.
5. Close the cereal box up once the piece of paper is inside.
6. Create two holes in the top of the box, one on each side.
7. Cut the holes out with scissors — one will be for your eye, and the other will be covered by foil.
8. Tape the top of the box down revealing the two holes.

9. Take a piece of aluminum foil and cover one of the holes up (it doesn’t matter which one you choose.)
10. Take your pen, make a tiny hole in the middle of the aluminum foil.

And you’re done!